Seeing Missions Correctly

Today in my Kingdom, Church and World class I listened to two chapel sermons on missions.  It was very eye-opening and I thought I’d post my personal notes here.  Some of these points may be a bit redundant, but in the essence of time, it is what I felt I would share.  Perhaps it will get you to think about missions in a different way and move you to perhaps help your local body of believers to see missions how I think Christ would want us to view it.

Sermons on Missions in America and The World

 

  • We must start missions locally, in our communities, building relationships on a consistent, regular basis.  This takes time but is a necessary step in building trust and striping away stereotypes.  We must learn the local culture and see their needs. 
  •  If you are not willing to embrace the diversity and different economic levels on a local level, where the whole church, the whole body of Christ can get involved, why would your congregation want to raise funds to send to another country?  How does that connect with them if they can’t see us model it on a local level here in our own backyard, with our own church?
  • Short term missions become superficial and stay on the surface if you do not build long term relationships.  Is there follow-up?  Do you go back invest in true relationships are you just “doing missions” for the sake of doing. 
  • Building relationships  take time, commitment, and sacrifice.  Look at Jesus as our model.  Pray to Jesus to give us wisdom, strength, and vision of how he’d want us to implement this locally.
  • The church needs to be the hands and feet of Jesus. We must show the love of God on a local level, in a consistent way, as a body united for his kingdom purposes.
  •  Our efforts must be genuine.  We must strive to learn their culture, their language, and their real needs.
  • The danger of America is that we know so little, so many of our short-term mission trips don’t work.
  • Do we truly love our brothers and sister?  We are blessed to be a blessing.
  • We are blessed with financial means, with educational means, with relational and resources mean.  We must use these to bless the less fortunate.
  • We must step back and see the big picture. “ Big picture thinking”.  We must ask root causes questions. ” Where there is no vision, the people perish”.  Proverbs 29:18 
  • Easy projects are not an honor to God’s name
  • Help your people know that they are career missionaries.  This is part of our Christian calling that we all have.
  • Help you people understand a mission agency is and the services it provides.
  • Does your local congregation see the part that they play?  Do they see the importance of it?  Do they see the kingdom relevance?  We must lead our congregations to this example; we must be the example for them to follow.  We must communicate this better, more creatively. 
  • Do a missions “blurb” or question in the bulletin about thinking about missions
  • Work under local Christians.  The danger is when we start building “our own kingdoms”
  • We need to be team players with local and global churches 
  • If you are not willing to embrace the diversity and different economic levels on a local level, where the whole church, the whole body of Christ can get involved, why would your congregation want to raise funds to send to another country?  How does that connect with them if they can’t see us model it on a local level here in our own backyard, with our own church?
  • We must teach a Biblical View of Missions 
  • There are negative stereotypes that Americans have about missions: We see people in other countries as exotic, as problems or good business contacts
  •         We try to make internationals an adventure or business as mission or problems that need to be solved.
  •         Other peoples are sinners, they are created in the image of God, they are whole persons as complex as we are.
  •         If we present other peoples in these ways we will not produce interest in missions to our congregations. 

 

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